Credits

Many, many ANGAIR members have contributed their deep knowledge, skill, time and enthusiasm to this website

Olivia and Bill Clarke

Among the many challenges of the year 2020, the impossibility of holding ANGAIR’s traditional Wildflower and Art Show loomed as a vexing loss, ironically in the Show’s much anticipated fiftieth year.
Bill and Olivia Clarke have addressed that challenge, working tirelessly to lead production of an online ANGAIR Nature Show.
It is their particular interest and skills in digital technology that are at the core of their contribution to ANGAIR. Bill brings extensive project management and IT experience. Olivia’s career focus has been the effective use of technology for learning. They initiated the digital asset management project (DAM). This work involves digitising the extensive collection of photographs and drawings of flora and fauna, as well as the diverse range of activities of ANGAIR, collected over its 50-year history. This repository has been a crucial resource for creating the virtual nature show.
Their remarkable diligence and focus have proved invaluable in what has been a massive task. Essentially beginning with a blank canvas, this website has been designed, constructed and brought to the public domain.
They have inspired and coordinated a very diverse group of contributors: interacting with insight, persistence and good grace

Photographers

The photographs used on the ANGAIR Nature Show 2020 website, and for the Show promotion, are by a group of very talented ANGAIR members. They have given ANGAIR permission to use their work and they retain copyright.

Jordan Ayton

When I started to photograph birds and wildlife, I focused a lot on the birds of prey – eagles, falcons etc. When I slowed down and looked for the smaller species, I was amazed at the abilities they have. Little birds don’t really stop or slow down, to photograph them and capture them in a nice way is a hard task. Most birds are adept at flying, but watching a Superb Fairy-Wren fly at top speed through a shrub or a vine is quite amazing, the decision making and the coordination to do such is a great wonder. All the birds are a great wonder, I hope you enjoy looking at them as much as I do

Ellinor Campbell

I started being Interested in birds in the early 1970s and birded alone for a few years using a bird book. I eventually joined Birdlife Australia, or the Bird Observers Club as it was then. This meant I was able to share information, and learn so much more about birds from experts. I had tried, but given up on learning about plants as no one book had the answers, and I had no mentors. In 1990, when we bought a house in Aireys Inlet, I joined ANGAIR and finally found the perfect avenue for ‘scratching the itch”. I was blown away by my first ANGAIR Flower Show and my first bus tour with Gwen, who was an early mentor. I was fortunate also to have Mary White as an early teacher, and then Margaret MacDonald and others such as Chris Morrissey. Mike Traynor the bird group leader, was a fount of bird knowledge. Birds and plants had finally come together for me. The only, and continuing, problem when going on walks is whether to look up or down! But then there is also fungi, bugs, and marine … So much to see and learn about! And what an amazing natural environment in which to live, with such bountiful and accessible biological diversity.

Margaret Lacey

I am an enthusiastic bird photographer spending my retirement on the Surf Coast in Aireys Inlet, Victoria, after a career in education. I have been a hobby photographer since childhood but my interest in bird photography really began when I spent weekends in Aireys Inlet taking quick snaps of birds to use later as an aid to identification. I soon applied an artistic eye to the photographs and as my skills and equipment improved I sought to document the local species for publication. My aim is to increase awareness of birds and the need for habitat preservation.
Margaret published her second book Birds of Aireys Inlet and Anglesea on the Great Ocean Road in 2017.

John Lenagan

Conservation Photographer
On retiring John pursued his passion as a conservation photographer and has been exploring various remote wilderness environments both in Australia and overseas.
He has worked with various conservationist groups and scientists recording both the habitats and the many endemic animals within.
In 2015 he and his wife Katrina bought a house in Anglesea where he has been exploring and recording the many native inhabitants of the Surf Coast and Great Otway National Park environments.
His species records for the area are now over 2,000 and that is just for the insects.
He has a love and fascination for all of nature including the numerous and vital Fungi and algae, and has a mission to record and present even the most obscure to validate the importance of its survival and indirectly our own.

Margaret MacDonald OAM

Margaret’s interest in the Anglesea-Aireys Inlet environment grew when she moved to Moggs Creek in 1989. She and her sister Kathie explored the district enthusiastically. Margaret also took every opportunity to accompany Mary White on field trips. Mary was keen to share her knowledge and Margaret equally keen to learn about the local flora and fauna. Mary became her mentor.
In 1992 Margaret found Merran’s Sun Orchid, Thelymitra x merraniae, (thought for 63 years to be extinct) at Moggs Creek, and her interest in terrestrial orchids escalated.
Margaret is the most regularly consulted authority on the local indigenous flora and continues to be one of its most impassioned and fearless advocates. She has edited or authored several ANGAIR publications including the field guide Flowers of Anglesea and Aireys Inlet (2009) and with Everett Foster co-authored Orchids of the Anglesea District (1999), currently in its third edition.
As a former teacher, Margaret has a special rapport with children, and has arranged many activities and outings for school groups from both local and Melbourne schools.
At the annual ANGAIR Wildflower Weekend, Margaret’s orchid display always attracts a crowd and her guided walks are fully booked and a special treat.
Over the years, Margaret has been involved in virtually every aspect of ANGAIR’s work.
Margaret was elected an Honorary Life Member of ANGAIR in 2012. She has received numerous accolades and several prestigious awards for her conservation work, including the Medal of the Order of Australia (2011) and the Australian Natural History Medallion (2015).

Sandra Taylor

Digital Image Editor

Having grown up in Anglesea, I now have a 50 year association with Anglesea and the surrounding areas. My working life has centred on secondary education and specialising in the visual arts. The main focus of this for some 25 years and including a Masters thesis, has been digital imaging. Specifically, this has included creating and manipulating photography, animation, audio and video.
Additionally, I have spent many hours enjoying and developing my knowledge of the beach and the bush in and around Anglesea. Now with digital imaging, it is a pleasure to be able to combine all of this to help document and protect this special environment, in some small way.

Key ANGAIR contributors to the Nature Show website

Skills needed to pull the Nature Show together have included design, research, writing, editing, Partner-liaison, funding, audio-visual production, publicity and promotion and project management – all skills which are found among these ANGAIR members:

  • Rod Brooks
  • Wendy Crebbin
  • Pauline Dean
  • Patrick Flanagan
  • Christine Forster
  • Peter Forster
  • Roger Ganly
  • Ruth Hurst
  • Les Lyons
  • Neville Millen
  • Eathorne Mitchell
  • Chris Morrissey
  • Gail Slykhuis
  • Kaye Traynor
  • Neil Tucker
  • Nat Utmar
  • Sally White
  • David Williams
  • Christine Williams

ANGAIR is also grateful to the many Partner organisations who have participated in the show – continuing the active role they play in the Annual Wildflower and Art Weekend